Today’s Writing Tip

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When writing a series, be sure to note at the conclusion of each volume (except the final one, of course) that the story will be continued. Include the title and link, if it’s already written, a potential release date otherwise. Without such information, readers may think you just got tired of writing and quit, leaving them frustrated with regard to what happens if you ended with a cliffhanger. If you didn’t, then readers may not realize that the story will be continued. If you know it’s going to be a series when you finish writing the first book, go ahead and put “Volume I” or “Book 1” (or something along those lines) on the cover, another clue for readers that there’s more to come.

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Today’s Writing Tip

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When writing a series, it’s helpful to go back and reread the previous stories before starting the next one. You’ll be surprised how many little details you can tie in or use to create new plot twists. Fans love it when they encounter and recognize such connections, which make them feel like an insider.

Rereading also helps you regain momentum established in the previous story, especially if it’s been a while since you wrote it. Being consistent with details is essential, such as character eye color, relationships, location descriptions, and so forth. Don’t ever assume no one will notice because you don’t even remember yourself. If a reader binge-reads the series later or has a steel-trap memory, you’re going to hear about it, probably in a less than friendly manner. Thus, it’s to your advantage to take the time to do it right. Your fans will appreciate it.

Today’s Writing Tip

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If your story becomes a series, remind your readers the fundamentals, such as what the characters look like and any important backstory information. This benefits not only those who read the earlier books sometime in the past, but helps those who start with a later episode.

As an author, your series is one continuous story, but it’s unlikely your readers will read all books in sequence, especially if they’re released at different times. You’ll want to draw them back into the story and plot as quickly as possible so they’re comfortably established. Also consider that your books may not be read in order. Thus, including a plot summary here and there or flashback to a previous story is essential; a prologue is another possibility.

You can find additional tips for writing a series here and here.

Today’s Writing Tip

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If your novel becomes a series, remember some readers may not start with book one. Describe the characters in each story and recap the plot and any key eventsĀ  so they’re not lost or confused. Loyal readers will appreciate the reminder as well, especially if it’s been a while since they read the previous volume. I have more tips for serial writers in two previous blogs, which you can find here and here.