The Dark Side of Total Eclipses

The path of the 2017 Total Eclipse is the one that begins in S. Carolina and ends in Oregon; the one in 2024 crosses from Maine through Texas; 2023 is annular and it crosses from Texas to Oregon. (Eclipse map generated by Sirius v. 3.0 astrological software)

Back in 2017 as I watched the Sun disappear behind the moon from Swan Valley, Idaho, I could fully understand why such events freaked out those who didn’t understand the phenomenon. It was cool, but it was creepy. My impression was that of God hiding his light.

And here’s the interesting part.

Eclipses can have rather ominous astrological implications. The one in 2017 had a path of visibility that crossed the USA. This is NOT a good omen. It signifies a divided country. It doesn’t take a genius to see how that has turned out.

Seriously.

And guess what?

In 2024 there’s another one that likewise crosses the country.

The paths of the 2017 and 2024 eclipse paths cross in the southern part of Illinois, right over Carbondale. Considering that’s right in the heart of the New Madrid fault, plus the fracking they’re doing in the area, doesn’t sound like a good place to be.

Why?

Right after the 2017 eclipse there was an earthquake in Idaho. Tidal forces of the moon plus the sun when the two are aligned is pretty strong. I’m not saying something bad will happen, but it’s something to think about.

Annular eclipses don’t have the impressive corona display because the moon is either too far away or not lined up perfectly. Thus, a ring of the sun remains visible around the edges of the moon rather than being able to see the Sun’s corona.

There’s another one coming in 2023 that’s annular as opposed to total, so it gets less publicity. Its path crosses Texas and is joined by that of the total eclipse in 2024 to form an “X” across Texas.

What does crossing something out signify to you? If you believe in “signs in the heavens and on the earth beneath” this should be rather alarming.

As an astrologer as well as a Christian, I don’t like the looks of this at all. The “X” on Texas is becoming too apparent. Pardon me while I depart from my usual “neutral stance” for a moment. Texas a “Red” state in the crosshairs of the liberals, who spent a lot of money trying to flip Texas “Blue” the last election. They failed at that, so now we’re being hit with a massive influx of illegal aliens and HR1, which will allow them to vote. If that’s not a massive effort to divide the Lone Star State, I don’t know what is.

So enough of the doom and gloom. If you want to see the next one, here are a few tips.

PLAN NOW TO VIEW THE NEXT ECLIPSE

The April 8, 2024 total eclipse is literally going to pass right over where I live in Central Texas. The good news is that I don’t have to go anywhere to see it! I’ve been thinking I should write a small book about eclipses, both from an astronomical and astrological angle, to sell, since the area will be deluged with people looking for souvenirs. If I get this accomplished as planned, I’ll let you know here sometime before the big event.

One matter of concern is that especially at that time of year it could be cloudy! I know any number of people who drove miles to see the last one only for it to be cloudy or rainy. Huge disappointment, to be sure. Thus, if you’re deciding to go view one, consider weather patterns for optimal chances of clear skies.

Another consideration is to head to a remote area. That way you avoid huge traffic jams on the Interstate or other major highways. If you’re planning to go see the next one, bear that in mind. That is unless you enjoy massive crowds and gridlocked freeways. Don’t underestimate how many people have the same idea.

I learned that lesson when I lived in Houston where a coworker told me how he and his family spent a hurricane in their car on the freeway. They waited too long to leave during the evacuation and got stuck on I-45 in the mass exodus. Everyone assumes the freeway is the quickest route, but that’s not the case when everyone has the same idea. In such situations, back roads and your GPS app are your best friend. Make your reservations for accommodations as far in advance as possible, too.

The website greatamericaneclipse.com is an excellent resource for detailed maps of the path as well as safety viewing equipment and other paraphernalia. Remember, the only time it’s safe to view an eclipse without protective eye gear is the few moments of totality!

Regardless of their symbolism, eclipses are rare and worth seeing in person. People often react to in an unexpected way. Be sure to take a few moments to consider what it’s saying to you.

OTHER RESOURCES

www.eclipse.org

skyandtelescope.org

eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov

3 thoughts on “The Dark Side of Total Eclipses

  1. Excellent explanation, Marcha. I don’t live in Texas, but I live in a Red state. After the election, I knew Texas and Florida would come under political attack — and they have. Sadly, very predictable. I hurt for the children at the border, the overwhelmed Border Patrol, all the good people trying their best against impossible odds, without any help from D.C. Unbelievable times.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: The Dark Side of Total Eclipses – Purrseidon

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